Posted by: boomerangcomesback | November 21, 2013

REAL FIGHTER JETS HAVE TWO SEATS…WCS – It Made the F-4E a “Triple-Threat” Fighter Aircraft

Let’s get into it shall we?

F-4E Phantom

F-4E Phantom


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/McDonnell_Douglas_F-4_Phantom_II

Comments welcome, and valuable information treasured…

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Responses

  1. On Tuesday, March 12, 2013 9:34:32 AM, John Rogers wrote:

    Thanks for passing this along Tim!

    Jolly

    On Mar 12, 2013, at 11:00 AM, Tim White wrote:

    — On Fri, 3/8/13, Tim White wrote:

    From: Tim White
    Subject: REAL FIGHTER JETS HAVE TWO SEATS…WCS – It Made the F-4E a “Triple-Threat” Fighter Aircraft
    To: SendUsYourShit AT fighterpilotuniversity.com
    Received: Friday, March 8, 2013, 9:55 PM

    WCS – it made the F-4E a “triple-threat” fighter aircraft

    WCS means WEAPONS CONTROL SYSTEM

    ….the photo that is shown below is the Westinghouse AN/APQ-120 Solid State (Transistors based) Weapons Fire Control/RADAR system which was equipping the F-4E Phantom — this was the World’s first solid state Weapons Fire Control/RADAR set and the most advanced in the World at the time to be mounted in a fighter-bomber aircraft — the “nose package” you see on it’s full extension rail…the technician’s left hand is resting on part of the X frame that bolts to the bulkhead just in back of the other technician’s right hand…the nose cone is then swung into place and bolted to the fuselage…components to the “nose package” are — display scopes in both cockpits,the AN/ASG-26 LCOSS(Lead Computing Optical Sight System) mounted above the pilot’s display scope,numerous components in the rear and front cockpits,components installed in various locations of the fuselage and wings,the wiring bundles and harnesses throughout the fuselage and wings–to the 9 weapons pylons and hard points — to the 4 AIM-7 Sparrow missile stations,inputs from all the other avionics/INS/ECM systems aboard — all of this made up the entire AN/APQ-120 system . The F-4E made it’s operational debut in the summer of 1968 while I was with the 47th TAC Fighter Squadron of the 15th TAC Fighter Wing at MacDill AFB in Tampa FL where I was then working on F-4D’s with the Westinghouse AN/APQ-109 vacuum tube based system — I then was upgraded to the F-4E after I took an 8 week course for the AN/APQ-120 system while at MacDill…when I arrived at MacDill on July 3 1967 I was working on F-4C’s with the less advanced Westinghouse APQ-100 system prior to working on F-4D’s – my tech school time was 3/4 spent on the APQ-109 since the F-4D was then rapidly replacing F-4C’s in squadron sized production lots and the 47th TFS transitioned from C’s to D’s about 5 months after my arrival and what a sight to see when one morning about 9:00am an ENTIRE squadron of 24 brand new F-4D’s straight from the McDonnell Aircraft plant in St Louis and landed by 2’s and each one taxied in spotted and chocked in front of our HANGAR 3 …the photo below was taken at Korat Royal Thai Air Base Thailand,the base of the 388th TAC Fighter Wing,where I was assigned to the 469th TAC Fighter Squadron – the first Squadron of F-4E’s to enter combat in SEA in November 1968 — I was stationed for 2 months at Korat before taking orders to DaNang Air Base Viet Nam,the base of the 366th TAC Fighter Wing–The GUNFIGHTERS – the first Wing of F-4’s to enter combat in SEA — where I worked on the F-4E’s and F-4D’s of 4 different squadrons,the 4th TAC Fighter Sq(F-4E),the 389th TAC Fighter Sq(F-4D),the 390th TAC Fighter Sq(F-4D),and the 421st TAC Fighter Sq(F-4E)…I held a TOP SECRET security clearance to work on these systems…

    Tim White,Viet Nam Vet(USAF)

    RADAR RUNNER

    3 years on the flightline

    “Real Fighter Jets Have Two Seats”

    Welcome to the WCS page

    F-4E WCS, Korat, 1970
    PLANES SYSTEMS JARGON IMAGES STORIES AUTHOR LINKS TDY SPECIAL WCS FUTURE WEBRINGS
    F-4E Weapons Control System, Korat, 1970

    [ Aircraft ] [ Systems ] [ Jargon ] [ Images ] [ Stories ] [ Author ]
    [ Links ] [ TDY ] [ Special ] [ WCS ] [ Future ] [ Webrings ]

    PACAFUSAFETAC
    An Extraordinary Bunch

    In the middle and late 1960s, the sophistication of high-tech electronic systems began to grow at a phenomenal rate. Fortunately, the USAF ( and a few other nations ) had a small number of technicians – rarely exceeding 600, worldwide – who had the ability to maintain, upgrade, and even improve upon these state-of-the-art systems. Sustained, at first, by the compelling “equality” of the Vietnam draft ( a rich source of competent and intelligent recruits who otherwise would have excelled in civilian life ) the switch to an all-volunteer military resulted in a slow decline in the “quality” of personnel available for this challenging task.

    They were farm boys and ghetto punks; college drop-outs and those who barely passed in high school. Scoring in the top 5 percent of the population in spatial perception, electronic/mechanical aptitude, and command of language, they were some of the best and the brightest the nation had to offer.
    Eventually, basically-analog systems ( containing digital components ) were completely replaced by digital; in many cases, the software writers had no idea how the electronics worked, and never considered the hardware to be a maintainable, alignable system. In a binary world of on/off, there was no room for a concept other than pass/fail. Maintenance mock-ups became “test stations” in a “smart machine/dumb technician” form of maintenance – and the WCS troops were no longer required. Failing components were trashed instead of repaired ( because no one knew how anymore ), and dependence upon “spares” grew, along with depot and manufacturer-level repair. WCS troops, as a species, started to become extinct. It was the end of an era.

    ============================================

    AFR 39-1
    Attachment 17 1 January 1969 A17-17

    AFSC 32271Q

    AIRMAN AIR FORCE SPECIALTY

    WEAPON CONTROL SYSTEMS TECHNICIAN

    1. SPECIALTY SUMMARY

    Inspects, installs, maintains, troubleshoots, overhauls, repairs, and modifies weapon control systems and associated equipment; and supervises weapon control systems activities. Related DOD Occupational Subgroup: 112.
    2. DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

    a. Analyzes performance and isolates malfunctions of weapons control systems. Operates weapon control systems by using proper controls to determine operational condition. Analyzes performance and isolates malfunctions to subsystems such as pulsed, doppler, and pulsed doppler radar system; electro-optical and infrared sighting and sensor systems; armament control systems; munitions release and launching systems; electronic counter-countermeasures systems; and analog and digital computer systems. Traces schematic, logic, and wiring diagrams, and uses appropriate built-in-tests; applicable electronic measuring equipment such as oscilloscopes, digital and analog voltmeters, signal generators, and power meters; recording and reproducing equipment; applicable support equipment, including automated programmed/manual testers; and general purpose and special handtools. Determines scope of repair or adjustment required to correct faulty operation. Monitors equipment performance to detect recurring malfunctions.
    b. Removes, repairs, installs, aligns, harmonizes, boresights, modifies, and conducts checkout of weapon control systems. Removes faulty line replaceable units. Checks line replaceable unit operation to determine scope of repair required. Disassembles unserviceable units down to smallest bit, piece, or module authorized, using necessary instruments, gauges, and special tools.. Repairs oscillator, amplifier, waveshaping and logic circuits, microwave equipment; servomechanisms; and electro-optical assemblies, by replacing solid state devices, vacuum tubes, microminiaturized modules, gyros, motors, tachometers, infrared sensing devices, and similar components. Assembles units after repair; performs alignment; and makes final shop check. Installs serviceable line replaceable unit into aircraft, and performs system alignment and harmonization. Boresights weapon control systems as required. Maintains and services system pressurization, cooling, closed cycle cryogenic, and dehydrating units. Modifies system line replaceable units according to applicable technical publications,
    c. Inspects weapon control systems. Inspects weapon control systems operational status. lnterprets inspection findings and determines adequacy of corrective action. Reviews maintenance management publications to obtain information applicable to weapon control systems and associated equipment. Evaluates justification and practicability of proposed modifications.
    d. Supervises weapon control systems personnel. Plans and schedules work assignments. Establishes work methods, production controls, and performance standards. Completes maintenance management and personnel reports and forms. Ensures availability of required maintenance equipment, tools, and spare parts. Assigns operation and maintenance functions to subordinates and establishes priorities for work accomplishment. Evaluates performance of weapon control systems personnel in terms of compliance with operation policies, preventive maintenance directives, and technical publications. Conducts on-the-job training programs.
    3. SPECIALTY QUALIFICATIONS

    a. Knowledge:
    (1) Knowledge of theory and application of electronic, microelectronic, and mechanical principles, theory and application of gyros, synchros, and ratio transformers, theory of ballistics; working principles of electro-optical devices and sensors; functional values of multiple dimensional cam; factors involved in radar and infrared search and target detection and identification; digital computer logic; use, care, and interpretation of testing and measuring devices; concepts and application of AFR 66-1, Maintenance Management, and/or AFR 66-5, Production Oriented Maintenance organization (PoMo); and principles of motion and power transmission by mechanical and electrical means is mandatory. Possession of mandatory knowledge will be determined according to AFR 35-1.
    (2) Knowledge of general functioning of associated systems such as automatic flight controls, instruments, navigation, communications, terrain following radars, flight sensing, countermeasures, and munitions release and launching systems and how they tie in to weapon control systems is desired.
    b. Experience:
    Qualification as a Weapon Control Systems Mechanic is mandatory. In addition, experience in performing or supervising functions such as analyzing and repairing weapon control systems defects or isolating electrical, electronic, and mechanical malfunctions of computers, radars, sights, armament controls, and related systems is desireable.
    c. Training:
    (1) Completion of prescribed 7-level management course is mandatory.
    (2) Completion of an advanced weapon control systems course is desirable.
    4. SPECIALTY SHREDOUTS

    Suffix Portion of AFS to Which Related
    A ………………………………. F-1O6A/B: (MA-1, ASQ-25 Systems)
    * B ………………………………. F-101/F-102: (MG-10 System)
    C ………………………………. F-106A/B: (MA-1, ASQ-25 Subsystems)
    * L ………………………………. F-100F
    * N ………………………………. F-105D/F/G: (R-12, Wild Weasel)
    P ………………………………. F-4C/D: (APQ-1O9/APA-165)
    Q ………………………………. F-4E/G: (APQ-120, Wild Weasel)
    * R ………………………………. F-111A/B
    * S ………………………………. A-7D, B-57G
    * None required…………………….. A-10, F-5E, AC-130

    ====================================================

    F-4E
    The McDonnell-Douglas F-4 aircraft was the primary Air Defense, Close Air Support, and Tactical Nuclear Strike weapon system of the USAF for 20 years, retiring only when a similarly-capable aircraft, the F-15E, became fully operational in 1988.
    In its air-to-ground role the F-4 can carry twice the normal bomb load of a world War II B-17. Its analog bombing computer (ASQ-91) target accuracy for Dive Toss bombing was better than 50 feet for a 500 lb bomb tossed more than three miles – without the aircraft ever passing over the dangerous target. One series was fitted with the ARN-101 digital bombing system, which enabled Continuously Computed Impact Point (CCIP) bombing, increasing the kill ratio for targets of opportunity ( but only after they reprogrammed it to accept that a radar mile is 6,000 feet – not 5,280 !).
    One external centerline 30mm gatling gun (similar to the A-10’s gun) could be carried for use against ground targets, as well as six AGM-65A/B/C/D video-guided Maverick missiles, or up to 18 GBU-15/17 laser-guided bombs ( with the AVQ-23 Pave Spike Laser Target Designator Pod installed ).
    Utilizing the AN/APQ-120 all-weather radar, the F-4E carried four AIM-7D/E/F Sparrow medium-range radar-guided missiles, four AIM-9L/M Sidewinder short-range missiles, and an internal M61A1 20mm cannon for Air-to-air encounters. 86 TFW Zulu Alert jetsLater series had TISEO (Target Identification System, Electro-Optical) built-in; this TV system improved target tracking at close ranges, and provided some stealth tracking capabilities. Certain F-4Es were converted to F-4G “Wild Weasel” configuration, replacing the F-105G WWs as SAM-missile site hunter-killers/electronic countermeasures aircraft.

    [ CONTINUE to the F-4E FAQ ]

    F-105G Wild Weasel

    The F-105 Thunderchief (“Thud”) was an older aircraft, even in the Vietnam era. Designed in the 1950s as a supersonic fighter-bomber capable of carrying a nuclear weapon internally, it was one of a very few fighters equipped with a bomb bay. During the war, two series were used: the F-105D single-seat strike fighter, and the F-105G Wild Weasel, a highly modified version of the F-105F dual-crewman trainer, with a Pilot and EWO (Electronics Warfare Officer).
    Standard load for the Wild Weasel included an extra fuel tank occupying the bomb bay, an external centerline tank slung beneath it, two outboard AGM-45 Shrike anti-SAM missiles, and an external tank onONE wing. The other wing contained the almost-magical AGM-78 Standard ARM, a huge anti-radiation missile – which had never failed to destroy a threatening SAM-missile site; it was 100 percent effective, even if the site’s SAM-guiding radar had shut down, or the launching aircraft had passed the target. The Wild Weasel was armed with an internal 20mm Gatling gun, it’s only self-protection against another attacking aircraft, even though it could carry AIM-9 Sidewinder missiles.

    This particular Thud is presently on display at Wright-Patterson’s Air Force Museum. During its operational lifetime ( 1964-1980 ), it saw assignment to McConnell AFB, Kansas, “Wild Weasel” duty at Takhli and Korat RTAFBs, and WW training at George AFB, CA. It flew many missions over North Vietnam where it became one of a select few claiming three MiG aircraft kills. The photo shows an AGM-45 Shrike missile loaded on the left outboard.

    ====================================================

    AGM-12C Bullpup

    To my knowledge, these are the only photos of AGM-12s on a combat jet anywhere on the net. The first PGMs of the post-WW II era, they were difficult to employ. The front seater flew the missile via a small joystick in front of the throttles, watching the smoke trail from the rear, while the WSO flew the plane.

    The top pic shows the short-lived intake art applied to Korat jets; this one was “Gator”, (34th TFS 67-0283) and is hard to see. The lower pic shows 67-370 just prior to taxiing out. Yes, those engines are running. Munitions load this trip: 2xAGM-12C, 6xMk-82, and 2xAIM-7E-2.
    We never did learn what target it was that required remotely controlled missiles to take down. Normally, our Dive Toss, throwing dumb iron bombs – was good enough!

  2. REAL FIGHTER JETS HAVE TWO SEATS…WCS – It Made the F-4E a “Triple-Threat” Fighter Aircraft

    On Tuesday, March 12, 2013 9:34:32 AM, John Rogers wrote:
    Thanks for passing this along Tim!

    Jolly

    On Mar 12, 2013, at 11:00 AM, Tim White wrote:

    — On Fri, 3/8/13, Tim White wrote:

    From: Tim White
    Subject: REAL FIGHTER JETS HAVE TWO SEATS…WCS – It Made the F-4E a “Triple-Threat” Fighter Aircraft
    To: SendUsYourShit AT fighterpilotuniversity.com
    Received: Friday, March 8, 2013, 9:55 PM

    WCS – it made the F-4E a “triple-threat” fighter aircraft

    WCS means WEAPONS CONTROL SYSTEM

    ….the photo that is shown below is the Westinghouse AN/APQ-120 Solid State (Transistors based) Weapons Fire Control/RADAR system which was equipping the F-4E Phantom — this was the World’s first solid state Weapons Fire Control/RADAR set and the most advanced in the World at the time to be mounted in a fighter-bomber aircraft — the “nose package” you see on it’s full extension rail…the technician’s left hand is resting on part of the X frame that bolts to the bulkhead just in back of the other technician’s right hand…the nose cone is then swung into place and bolted to the fuselage…components to the “nose package” are — display scopes in both cockpits,the AN/ASG-26 LCOSS(Lead Computing Optical Sight System) mounted above the pilot’s display scope,numerous components in the rear and front cockpits,components installed in various locations of the fuselage and wings,the wiring bundles and harnesses throughout the fuselage and wings–to the 9 weapons pylons and hard points — to the 4 AIM-7 Sparrow missile stations,inputs from all the other avionics/INS/ECM systems aboard — all of this made up the entire AN/APQ-120 system . The F-4E made it’s operational debut in the summer of 1968 while I was with the 47th TAC Fighter Squadron of the 15th TAC Fighter Wing at MacDill AFB in Tampa FL where I was then working on F-4D’s with the Westinghouse AN/APQ-109 vacuum tube based system — I then was upgraded to the F-4E after I took an 8 week course for the AN/APQ-120 system while at MacDill…when I arrived at MacDill on July 3 1967 I was working on F-4C’s with the less advanced Westinghouse APQ-100 system prior to working on F-4D’s – my tech school time was 3/4 spent on the APQ-109 since the F-4D was then rapidly replacing F-4C’s in squadron sized production lots and the 47th TFS transitioned from C’s to D’s about 5 months after my arrival and what a sight to see when one morning about 9:00am an ENTIRE squadron of 24 brand new F-4D’s straight from the McDonnell Aircraft plant in St Louis and landed by 2’s and each one taxied in spotted and chocked in front of our HANGAR 3 …the photo below was taken at Korat Royal Thai Air Base Thailand,the base of the 388th TAC Fighter Wing,where I was assigned to the 469th TAC Fighter Squadron – the first Squadron of F-4E’s to enter combat in SEA in November 1968 — I was stationed for 2 months at Korat before taking orders to DaNang Air Base Viet Nam,the base of the 366th TAC Fighter Wing–The GUNFIGHTERS – the first Wing of F-4’s to enter combat in SEA — where I worked on the F-4E’s and F-4D’s of 4 different squadrons,the 4th TAC Fighter Sq(F-4E),the 389th TAC Fighter Sq(F-4D),the 390th TAC Fighter Sq(F-4D),and the 421st TAC Fighter Sq(F-4E)…I held a TOP SECRET security clearance to work on these systems…

    Tim White,Viet Nam Vet(USAF)

    RADAR RUNNER

    3 years on the flightline

    “Real Fighter Jets Have Two Seats”

    Welcome to the WCS page

    F-4E WCS, Korat, 1970
    PLANES SYSTEMS JARGON IMAGES STORIES AUTHOR LINKS TDY SPECIAL WCS FUTURE WEBRINGS
    F-4E Weapons Control System, Korat, 1970
    [ Aircraft ] [ Systems ] [ Jargon ] [ Images ] [ Stories ] [ Author ]
    [ Links ] [ TDY ] [ Special ] [ WCS ] [ Future ] [ Webrings ]

    PACAFUSAFETAC
    An Extraordinary Bunch

    In the middle and late 1960s, the sophistication of high-tech electronic systems began to grow at a phenomenal rate. Fortunately, the USAF ( and a few other nations ) had a small number of technicians – rarely exceeding 600, worldwide – who had the ability to maintain, upgrade, and even improve upon these state-of-the-art systems. Sustained, at first, by the compelling “equality” of the Vietnam draft ( a rich source of competent and intelligent recruits who otherwise would have excelled in civilian life ) the switch to an all-volunteer military resulted in a slow decline in the “quality” of personnel available for this challenging task.
    They were farm boys and ghetto punks; college drop-outs and those who barely passed in high school. Scoring in the top 5 percent of the population in spatial perception, electronic/mechanical aptitude, and command of language, they were some of the best and the brightest the nation had to offer.
    Eventually, basically-analog systems ( containing digital components ) were completely replaced by digital; in many cases, the software writers had no idea how the electronics worked, and never considered the hardware to be a maintainable, alignable system. In a binary world of on/off, there was no room for a concept other than pass/fail. Maintenance mock-ups became “test stations” in a “smart machine/dumb technician” form of maintenance – and the WCS troops were no longer required. Failing components were trashed instead of repaired ( because no one knew how anymore ), and dependence upon “spares” grew, along with depot and manufacturer-level repair. WCS troops, as a species, started to become extinct. It was the end of an era.

    ============================================

    AFR 39-1
    Attachment 17 1 January 1969 A17-17
    AFSC 32271Q
    AIRMAN AIR FORCE SPECIALTY
    WEAPON CONTROL SYSTEMS TECHNICIAN
    1. SPECIALTY SUMMARY
    Inspects, installs, maintains, troubleshoots, overhauls, repairs, and modifies weapon control systems and associated equipment; and supervises weapon control systems activities. Related DOD Occupational Subgroup: 112.
    2. DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES
    a. Analyzes performance and isolates malfunctions of weapons control systems. Operates weapon control systems by using proper controls to determine operational condition. Analyzes performance and isolates malfunctions to subsystems such as pulsed, doppler, and pulsed doppler radar system; electro-optical and infrared sighting and sensor systems; armament control systems; munitions release and launching systems; electronic counter-countermeasures systems; and analog and digital computer systems. Traces schematic, logic, and wiring diagrams, and uses appropriate built-in-tests; applicable electronic measuring equipment such as oscilloscopes, digital and analog voltmeters, signal generators, and power meters; recording and reproducing equipment; applicable support equipment, including automated programmed/manual testers; and general purpose and special handtools. Determines scope of repair or adjustment required to correct faulty operation. Monitors equipment performance to detect recurring malfunctions.
    b. Removes, repairs, installs, aligns, harmonizes, boresights, modifies, and conducts checkout of weapon control systems. Removes faulty line replaceable units. Checks line replaceable unit operation to determine scope of repair required. Disassembles unserviceable units down to smallest bit, piece, or module authorized, using necessary instruments, gauges, and special tools.. Repairs oscillator, amplifier, waveshaping and logic circuits, microwave equipment; servomechanisms; and electro-optical assemblies, by replacing solid state devices, vacuum tubes, microminiaturized modules, gyros, motors, tachometers, infrared sensing devices, and similar components. Assembles units after repair; performs alignment; and makes final shop check. Installs serviceable line replaceable unit into aircraft, and performs system alignment and harmonization. Boresights weapon control systems as required. Maintains and services system pressurization, cooling, closed cycle cryogenic, and dehydrating units. Modifies system line replaceable units according to applicable technical publications,
    c. Inspects weapon control systems. Inspects weapon control systems operational status. lnterprets inspection findings and determines adequacy of corrective action. Reviews maintenance management publications to obtain information applicable to weapon control systems and associated equipment. Evaluates justification and practicability of proposed modifications.
    d. Supervises weapon control systems personnel. Plans and schedules work assignments. Establishes work methods, production controls, and performance standards. Completes maintenance management and personnel reports and forms. Ensures availability of required maintenance equipment, tools, and spare parts. Assigns operation and maintenance functions to subordinates and establishes priorities for work accomplishment. Evaluates performance of weapon control systems personnel in terms of compliance with operation policies, preventive maintenance directives, and technical publications. Conducts on-the-job training programs.
    3. SPECIALTY QUALIFICATIONS
    a. Knowledge:
    (1) Knowledge of theory and application of electronic, microelectronic, and mechanical principles, theory and application of gyros, synchros, and ratio transformers, theory of ballistics; working principles of electro-optical devices and sensors; functional values of multiple dimensional cam; factors involved in radar and infrared search and target detection and identification; digital computer logic; use, care, and interpretation of testing and measuring devices; concepts and application of AFR 66-1, Maintenance Management, and/or AFR 66-5, Production Oriented Maintenance organization (PoMo); and principles of motion and power transmission by mechanical and electrical means is mandatory. Possession of mandatory knowledge will be determined according to AFR 35-1.
    (2) Knowledge of general functioning of associated systems such as automatic flight controls, instruments, navigation, communications, terrain following radars, flight sensing, countermeasures, and munitions release and launching systems and how they tie in to weapon control systems is desired.
    b. Experience:
    Qualification as a Weapon Control Systems Mechanic is mandatory. In addition, experience in performing or supervising functions such as analyzing and repairing weapon control systems defects or isolating electrical, electronic, and mechanical malfunctions of computers, radars, sights, armament controls, and related systems is desireable.
    c. Training:
    (1) Completion of prescribed 7-level management course is mandatory.
    (2) Completion of an advanced weapon control systems course is desirable.
    4. SPECIALTY SHREDOUTS
    Suffix Portion of AFS to Which Related
    A ………………………………. F-1O6A/B: (MA-1, ASQ-25 Systems)
    * B ………………………………. F-101/F-102: (MG-10 System)
    C ………………………………. F-106A/B: (MA-1, ASQ-25 Subsystems)
    * L ………………………………. F-100F
    * N ………………………………. F-105D/F/G: (R-12, Wild Weasel)
    P ………………………………. F-4C/D: (APQ-1O9/APA-165)
    Q ………………………………. F-4E/G: (APQ-120, Wild Weasel)
    * R ………………………………. F-111A/B
    * S ………………………………. A-7D, B-57G
    * None required…………………….. A-10, F-5E, AC-130

    ====================================================

    F-4E
    The McDonnell-Douglas F-4 aircraft was the primary Air Defense, Close Air Support, and Tactical Nuclear Strike weapon system of the USAF for 20 years, retiring only when a similarly-capable aircraft, the F-15E, became fully operational in 1988.
    In its air-to-ground role the F-4 can carry twice the normal bomb load of a world War II B-17. Its analog bombing computer (ASQ-91) target accuracy for Dive Toss bombing was better than 50 feet for a 500 lb bomb tossed more than three miles – without the aircraft ever passing over the dangerous target. One series was fitted with the ARN-101 digital bombing system, which enabled Continuously Computed Impact Point (CCIP) bombing, increasing the kill ratio for targets of opportunity ( but only after they reprogrammed it to accept that a radar mile is 6,000 feet – not 5,280 !).
    One external centerline 30mm gatling gun (similar to the A-10’s gun) could be carried for use against ground targets, as well as six AGM-65A/B/C/D video-guided Maverick missiles, or up to 18 GBU-15/17 laser-guided bombs ( with the AVQ-23 Pave Spike Laser Target Designator Pod installed ).
    Utilizing the AN/APQ-120 all-weather radar, the F-4E carried four AIM-7D/E/F Sparrow medium-range radar-guided missiles, four AIM-9L/M Sidewinder short-range missiles, and an internal M61A1 20mm cannon for Air-to-air encounters. 86 TFW Zulu Alert jetsLater series had TISEO (Target Identification System, Electro-Optical) built-in; this TV system improved target tracking at close ranges, and provided some stealth tracking capabilities. Certain F-4Es were converted to F-4G “Wild Weasel” configuration, replacing the F-105G WWs as SAM-missile site hunter-killers/electronic countermeasures aircraft.
    [ CONTINUE to the F-4E FAQ ]

    F-105G Wild Weasel

    The F-105 Thunderchief (“Thud”) was an older aircraft, even in the Vietnam era. Designed in the 1950s as a supersonic fighter-bomber capable of carrying a nuclear weapon internally, it was one of a very few fighters equipped with a bomb bay. During the war, two series were used: the F-105D single-seat strike fighter, and the F-105G Wild Weasel, a highly modified version of the F-105F dual-crewman trainer, with a Pilot and EWO (Electronics Warfare Officer).
    Standard load for the Wild Weasel included an extra fuel tank occupying the bomb bay, an external centerline tank slung beneath it, two outboard AGM-45 Shrike anti-SAM missiles, and an external tank onONE wing. The other wing contained the almost-magical AGM-78 Standard ARM, a huge anti-radiation missile – which had never failed to destroy a threatening SAM-missile site; it was 100 percent effective, even if the site’s SAM-guiding radar had shut down, or the launching aircraft had passed the target. The Wild Weasel was armed with an internal 20mm Gatling gun, it’s only self-protection against another attacking aircraft, even though it could carry AIM-9 Sidewinder missiles.
    This particular Thud is presently on display at Wright-Patterson’s Air Force Museum. During its operational lifetime ( 1964-1980 ), it saw assignment to McConnell AFB, Kansas, “Wild Weasel” duty at Takhli and Korat RTAFBs, and WW training at George AFB, CA. It flew many missions over North Vietnam where it became one of a select few claiming three MiG aircraft kills. The photo shows an AGM-45 Shrike missile loaded on the left outboard.

    ====================================================

    AGM-12C Bullpup
    To my knowledge, these are the only photos of AGM-12s on a combat jet anywhere on the net. The first PGMs of the post-WW II era, they were difficult to employ. The front seater flew the missile via a small joystick in front of the throttles, watching the smoke trail from the rear, while the WSO flew the plane.
    The top pic shows the short-lived intake art applied to Korat jets; this one was “Gator”, (34th TFS 67-0283) and is hard to see. The lower pic shows 67-370 just prior to taxiing out. Yes, those engines are running. Munitions load this trip: 2xAGM-12C, 6xMk-82, and 2xAIM-7E-2.
    We never did learn what target it was that required remotely controlled missiles to take down. Normally, our Dive Toss, throwing dumb iron bombs – was good enough!

  3. Glad to see you were able to post Mr. Tim! Good stuff there. If you were able to work with WordPress, etc., and thus create your own “post”, you would find that you were able to post photos without “upgrading” which costs a monthly fee (I believe).

    At ease, sir, and continue to post your thoughts…

  4. thanx Boomer for setting up this page – I really appreciate you reaching out to me – NOW perhaps we can come onto the same page..I’m many times in a unique position related to people/events that have come into my life in some manner and I honestly do NOT mean to be egocentric in what I write – or HOW I write – to put myself over others…but I DO have some REAL experiences to post that many others have NOT had so it’s not meant also to be “a-know-it-all”…just that I have survived A LOT really nasty shit against me including multiple attempts on my life since 1995…so this DOES make me “kinda sensitive” if you catch my drift…you can contact me directly ya know…

    thanx,

    Tim White phantom.421366 AT yahoo.com

  5. I was just a lowly machinist making the aileron pivots which we whittled from forgings. I guess I did My small part in defending democracy (read bombing hamlets back into the stone-age) whatevs.

    • 50,000 TON FORGING PRESS – the WORLD’S LARGEST – MADE POSSIBLE ALL MODERN JET AIRCRAFT

      Hot forging was done at Wymann Gordon on the East Coast. 50000 ton forging press, nicknamed the “Major”.

      http://files.asme.org/ASMEORG/Communities/History/Landmarks/5662.pdf

      After you read this PDF document you will see how tremendously huge this task was.

      Under Kelly Johnson’s insistence and direction, it was made plain to the Department of Defense that, one day, it would have to invest in heavy, 250,000 ton metal forming presses. When the A-12 / SR-71 series was built, none were available. In fact, those used in it’s construction were over fifteen years old and had been confiscated from Germany at the close of World War II, they were 2 each 16,000 ton forging presses. The Soviets confiscated the Germans enormous 33,000 ton press. The Germans had the plans for a 55,000 ton press but, the Soviets confiscated those plans also.

      I can certify that the hot forging’s used on the Blackbirds are of great considerable strength. I have tried to cut them using a large high speed abrasive chop saw only to destroy the blade. I did however manage to make a tiny groove. It appears that as soon as the forging heats up, the high pressure hot forged titanium “work hardens” itself to the point of indestructibility.

      It is said that because of the extreme heating and cooling cycles over its lifetime (aerodynamic heating), each aircraft titanium structure actually became stronger (annealed) every time it flew. The Blackbirds are literally hot airplanes. In sustained supersonic cruise, external skin temperatures vary from a low 450 deg F to a high near 1,100 deg F. The skin reaches it’s steady-state temperature about 11 minuets after cruise speed has been stabilized and it takes up to 35 minuets before the primary structure heats up to equilibrium values. Those same times can be expected when cooling down and the ground crews were cautioned not to touch certain areas of the aircraft after it had landed until it was cooled down. The thermal dynamics in maintaining structural temperatures varied greatly depending on the environment such as the inconsistent temperatures at altitude and speed. Two other factors that controlled thermodynamic heating was the high emissivity black paint (Lockheed Coating #144) and the JP-7 jet fuel.

      In 1968, the highly specialized tooling used in manufacturing the SR-71 was ordered to be destroyed by then-Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara, per contractual obligations at the end of production. Destroying the tooling killed any chance of there being an F-12B, but also limited the SR-71 force to the 32 completed, the final SR-71 order having to be cancelled when the tooling was destroyed.

      Dear Dan,

      I wanted to start off by saying thank you for the USAF SR-71 coin, it’s beautiful and not many people would appreciate what you’ve sent me. I do. I’m Going to try and figure out a way to incorporate the thin stick of Ti somewhere on the dash board or safety cage. Def something different:))

      As for the two rings. I’m speechless. Your work is truly unique and I’m thankful to have found you. Thank you for your time, patience and personal touch. Have a great Christmas and Happy New Year. I will be in touch after the new year to discuss some things. Monday I will send out that package for you. Thank you again Daniel. Really thank you!!!

      Joshua Hershkoff

      CFO / Owner / Driver
      Tweeks Racing Industries
      5169-5171 G Street
      Chino, CA

      Wyman-Gordon – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
      en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wyman-Gordon
      The 50,000-ton press was the largest machine in the world at the time, ten stories …Wyman-Gordon was a pioneer in forging titanium, with the first main use …
      File:Wyman Gordon 50000 ton press.jpg – Wikimedia Commons
      commons.wikimedia.org/…/File:Wyman_Gordon_50000_ton_press.j…
      Jan 1, 2013 – File:Wyman Gordon 50000 ton press.jpg … Grafton, Massachusetts TheWyman-Gordon Forging Press, along with a similar press owned by the …
      Hydraulic Forging Press – ASME Landmarks – ASME
      http://www.asme.org › … › Landmarks › Topics MZ › Manufacturing – 1
      This hydraulic closed-die press, among the largest fabrication tools in the world, has …Hammer (1876); #89 Wyman-Gordon 50,000-ton Hydraulic Forging Pres …
      [PDF]
      to read more… – Accurex Measurement Inc
      http://www.accurexmeasure.com/…/cmsc%202008%20w%20credit%20-
      File Format: PDF/Adobe Acrobat – Quick View
      complex forgings with multiple cavities such as valve bodies, in a single heating and pressing cycle. Wyman-Gordon 50,000 Ton Forge Press. Wyman-Gordon is …
      Mesta Machine 50,000 ton press
      http://www.practicalmachinist.com › … › Antique Machinery and History
      16 posts – 12 authors – 24 Nov 2008
      As far as I know the big Mesta and other similar big presses are still being used. For example the 50,000 ton Wyman-Gordon forging press at …
      Images for Wyman Gordon 50000 ton forging press – Report images

      The machines that made the Jet Age – Boing Boing
      boingboing.net/2012/02/13/machines.html
      Feb 13, 2012 – The Heavy Press Program also supplied Wyman-Gordon of Grafton, Massachusetts, with a 50,000- and 35,000-ton pair of forging presses.

  6. Acknowledged Mr. T. Welcome aboard!

    The populace needs people, survivors, who are real, who are honest and forthright, and willing to share their experience and expertise to navigate these uncharted dark waters. Bring your knowledge humbly to those starving for the Truth, and you will win hearts and minds. That’s it. As you see there is a polarizing happening around us. Gray is going, going, turning either black or white.

    Hey Kornisking! You’ll never be “lowly” ’round here. Keep your cannon primed with grapeshot.

    I just ran across this piece by Dave Hodges. I’m interested in the take on this by those of you who were “of age” at the time, have personal experience, or knowledge that might shine more light?

    http://www.pakalertpress.com/2013/11/20/jfk-murder-fifty-years-later-and-the-cover-up-continues/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+pakalert+%28Pak+Alert+Press%29

  7. Swarmanoid : A heterogeneous robotic swarm made up of three types of robot; hand-bots, foot-bots, and eye-bots.


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