Posted by: Puddy Dunne | February 7, 2013

From Patricia Ormsby, our friend in Japan




My husband and I just found out about this today (okay yesterday, we just got home and it is 2:00 a.m., but I’m not going to sleep until I get this out to you).  A new book released by Benjamin Fulford in Japan on February 1, Nihon ni shikakerareta saigo no baburu (The final bubble unleashed on Japan) alerted us that banks and other institutions in Japan are no longer accepting the dollar currency that is currently in circulation in the US.  Apparently, this has been going on since late last year.  No date is mentioned, but one traveller to the US reported that he acquired dollars there and was able to exchange them in Canada, but when he returned to Japan, he was unable to exchange them, and he was essentially stuck with worthless paper. The banks are only accepting the newly released dollar currency.  The notes released by the FRB from 2008 are not being accepted.


This is not merely a rumor.  One of my students who travels a lot confirmed that he was unable to exchange dollar currency as of late December, and this is apparently happening throughout Asia, and also Europe now.  If you are carrying the currency being used in the US right now, you cannot use it abroad, except for Canada (and maybe a few other countries–information is lacking).  He will be travelling next week to Myanmar, and as a result, he needed to go to the bank and exchange yen for the new dollar currency, which he showed us.  It is basically closely similar to the bills now in circulation, but the faces are slightly bigger and new colors have been added so the different denominations are easier to distinguish from each other.  The reason for this sudden rejection of the old money, as explained by the banks, is that North Korea has produced so many counterfeit bills that the old ones are considered worthless.


In our recent travel to the US (December 19 to January 13) we never encountered these new bills.  I wonder what would have happened if we had presented one (had we acquired them in Japan before departing) at a restaurant in America.  We saw only the old style in the US.


There has been no news of this in Japan or, apparently, America.  I tried googling it, and the latest I could find on new US dollar bills was which says,

“Update December 19, 2012  So far, there is no word about a release date for the new $100 bill bearing the portrait of Benjamin Franklin with all sorts of new and colorful anti-counterfeiting printing on the bill.  But we do know from the Federal Reserve that they will give us six months notice before the actual release date. Hope springs eternal that the new bills will actually be released.  Some of the bills were sent to a Federal Reserve branch in New Jersey a few months ago perhaps in preparation for a nationwide release.  By the way, some of the bills were reported stolen from a shipment to New Jersey.

“As you know, the release was delayed when officials of the Bureau of Engraving and Printing discovered a massive printing error and government officials said it would take months to sort through what bills could be released and what bills would end up in a shredder.  You have to think that since the original release date was supposed to be February of 2011 that the BEP must be getting close to a release date.”

A couple of years ago, there was some fuss about North Korea counterfeiting $100 notes, but it is not only the $100 bills being rejected abroad, but all the old currency.  Because we did not try to exchange our leftover dollars when we returned to Japan, we did not learn about this until now.  There are probably a lot of other people thinking it would be worthwhile in these times to hang onto spare dollars.  There’s been no outcry yet.

I’ll let you consider the ramifications of millions of people who’ve been holding cash in the world’s reserve, internationally accepted reliable currency suddenly learning that they’ve been stiffed.  The only recourse it seems is to find someone who is going to the States and work out a deal with them.  It also strikes me as a possible attempt to prevent an outflux of currency from the US, and it reminds me of an experience I had in Russia about 15 years ago, when I led a tour there and we could not find any banks that would accept Japanese yen.  A month prior they’d been all too glad to, and one or two of the tellers confided that the problem was their bank simply did not have any rubles.  Finally one of the scruffy loafers by the door of the final bank took us to his grubby little corner office and scrounged up some rubles for us–black market to the rescue!  We also paid our guides in US dollars, which a week subsequent gained by a factor of, I think it was five, versus the ruble.

Update 2/8/13:  I have not been able to find out anything else about new US currency abroad.  We saw the new bills with our very own eyes because I have a student involved as an individual in international commerce, who is suitably outraged to have been told the paper bills he had were worthless.  Another student of mine works for a bank, but has heard nothing.  I was able to exchange a $100 US note at Narita Airport (approx. 6% fee) on December 13.  I don’t know whether the person described by Benjamin Fulford tried exchanging his dollars at the airport or elsewhere.  I’ll keep looking into this.




  1. Patrick, thank you for posting this for me! You are on top of things despite your own crisis. May I extend my heartfelt condolences!

    In fact, I was in America because my own father caught some awful kind of cold going around, that was characterized by a barking cough that went on for week after week. It sounded to me like he may have had pertussis, though no outbreak was reported for Denver. He and Mom had received that vaccination, so none of their doctors would even presume to consider it as a possibility. He suffered subsequently from pneumonia, followed by multiple organ failures and passed away at 85 on December 29. I am still grieving.

    He too had been physically and socially active until his illness.

    May I ask when your father got the influenza vaccine? I don’t know the timing of my father’s vaccinations (he was not COTO material), and my mother is hostile, particularly toward this subject.

    • Regarding the new currency, Rice Farmer, who has a blogspot blog and lives in Japan, is looking into this as well, and he has turned up as much as I: to quote my late uncle Vikke, who was good at it, “Nutting! Nutting! Not a ting!!”

    • Thanks Patricia.

      396-693 right in the face

      Info likes this get me all a tingle thinking about multiple ways this situation could play out. 396-693. PM Hedge , Collapse scenarios, Market triggers, IMF, the Fed. WMD and multiple angles in this. Thanks and it is great to have you back and giving us the Corbett angle from the Island.

      I knew what would happen with Dad, I was prepared after his November innoculation. We expect what we preach here, therefore I cannot express shock. Sorry to hear that another COTO member has lost a love one. My condolences and prayers to you too. My Dad was 85 as well. I saw him last on 1/3/13.

      Pat, Dad got the shot sometime in late November and it had time to go to work on the immune system before the PTB unleashed their variant H3N2v. His wife said he was sitting up in a chair out of bed at 11:30pm and when she returned to check him at 2:00am, he was in bed, expired and cold. He ate soup, had appetite before 11:00 and was feeling good enough to sit in chair. I don’t know?

      She on the other hand did not get the flu shot, she had the flu in December and said it was mild and just a few days. I think he got live virus (of unknown origin) and it was the Baxter scenario.

      Maybe it’s a case of Russian Roulette.?

      Deb do you dispense them at your work? Are their different types depending upon age or other factors?

      • No Patrick. I work for orthopedic surgeons. They get the shots themselves but we don’t give them out in the office. None of the girls in the office would dare get a shot but the medical “gods” we work for can’t wait to get theirs. THey don’t have a clue what’s in them..

  2. Thanks for your article Patricia and the heads up. I hadn’t heard a thing about them producing new currency. The bit about them being shipped to NJ’s federal reserve and bills being missing is interesting. Sounds like another financial scam is in the works. Keep us posted if you hear anything new.

    As for your father also getting the flu shot and becoming deathly ill from it, as Patrick’s dad, makes me very angry. May I ask how soon after he got the shot that he became ill? Everyone Coto knows, by taking one of their poison injections, you are playing Russian roulette with your health and even your life. There is no telling how it will affect an individual. They seem to be targeting senior citizens(to get rid of them, in my opinion) and the very young (to introduce auto immune disorders, brain injury, diabetes etc) which they probably feel is necessary to speed up their depopulation plan and in the case of the young , keep big pharma in big bucks.

    So sad that they have the population in general, especially the elderly, so conditioned to believe whatever the dr and the teevee people tell them. Which is why it’s so important to keep getting the word out.

    • I’ve thought there could be a frequency factor, but it surely could be a distribution roulette. With the science I have posted regarding synthesized protein introduction, and designer folding-defective polypeptides role in immune system function, I can see the effect in the rise of bronc. pneumonia for elderly and a assortment of doors opening for diseases for younger populations. The blood brain barrier bypassed in all cases.

      • The blood-brain barrier is more significant than most people would realize. I know I’m preaching to the choir here, but it is the BBB that protects our brains from harmful substances, including the prions that are implicated in BSE (mad-cow disease). As BSE mimics Alzheimers, it may be that a lot of the latter is being improperly diagnosed. Cell phones, too, have been shown to break down the BBB. The late Dr. Neil Cherry explained to an audience in Japan that the real damage starts after about three minutes of cell phone use–but of course that might vary. I do not have a cell phone, but if your job demands it of you, you should limit your calls to 1-2 minutes, and explain it as efficiency.

    • It is so good to be in touch with you again, JG. I know nothing about my father’s vaccination schedule except that he’d been convinced it was good for him. He was gradually improving in the hospital, when he suddenly died, and the nurses said it was a heart attack. Whatever it was that got him ravaged his internal organs.

      • I thank GOD that he died at home versus under clinical care. I feared the scenario of the hospital and would have done my best to force his wife not to take him there. Maybe gunpoint would not have been out of the question. It almost qualifies as a broken hip syndrome once they get you into those beds.

        I had a friend who went in for a leg blood clot and now he’s fighting MRSA and another bacterium in the brain. I don’t know if he will survive.

  3. Update 2/8/13: I have received information that the new bills have been released in the US, presumably late last year, but they are not widely seen. They are not different enough from the old to get much attention, so I guess they went out without much fanfare.

    In the past, I’ve heard sporadically of countries refusing to accept any dollars that were not crisp and neat, but in my travels, I never actually encountered it. In each case it was said that the local currency was unstable and old bills might be out of date, so the same was assumed for other currencies.

    While the situation is not as dire as I first thought–visibly different versions of the currency valid in different countries–this is the first time I’ve heard of Japanese institutions refusing to honor currency still in circulation in America. We’re not just talking about pocket-laundered $1 notes that really should be rejected. This is of greatest significance in Japan, where people eschew credit and hold lots of cash at home. It is probably a sneaky way to take a significant amount of cash out of circulation, but I don’t know what other rationales there may be.

    • I’ve gotten 20 dollar bills that were appreciably different in the past few months, but they were mixed with other fairly new bills that looked the same as always. I remember remarking as to the larger portrait and more color at the counter when buying cigarettes. She looked and went “oh yea, look at that” and pulled a 20 out of the drawer and said “yea it’s different” drew a line on it with one of those pens, and then said, “well it’s real”….I said, “good, I just got it out of my bank’s ATM”.

      I seem to remember a ten dollar bill as well, but no fried tomatoes ala certainoids on that.

      What this all turns out to mean will surely come to the fore soon enough, and it will likely not be happy time.


Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment: Logo

You are commenting using your account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: